Jul 20, 2021

5 Takeaways from Rebecca Minkoff's New Book Fearless


Fashion fans: if you're looking for something fun to read this summer, look no further than Rebecca Minkoff's new book Fearless. Those of you that know me well, know that I'm a sucker for two things: fashion exhibits and fashion books. So naturally, when I stumbled upon this book at the airport while waiting for a recent flight to LA, I purchased it. I'll be honest, I haven't kept up with her career aside from noticing when she appeared on Project Runway: Fashion Startup back in 2016, but I do remember the popularity of her handbags from back in the day. 

The book is divided into 21 different rules for success, including things like "Go for Purpose Over Payout", "Create Two Way Streets", and "Communicate Your Heart Out", which as a fashion publicist, resonates with me deeply. The book starts out by diving into Rebecca's early days in the fashion industry. She became a household name when a "I Love New York" t-shirt she designed was worn by a famous actress on The Tonight Show. Four years later, she designed her first handbag, and the rest is history. Here are my 5 favorite takeaways from the book. 


#1 - You Have More to Offer Than You Might Think 

In the early days of Rebecca's New York journey, she had no friends and virtually no money so she decided to spend her free time volunteering and began picking up hours at a space that hosted gallery nights for up-and-coming artists. "The only things I had to offer," says Rebecca, "were time and energy." Through the experience, she met like-minded people, expanded her network, and found a connection point to the city. 

There are so many young people today who are eager to break into the fashion industry but hold themselves back because they think they have nothing to offer when nothing could be further from the truth. Don't underestimate the value of time and energy. It's a resource that not everyone has, so if you have the time, interest, and energy to volunteer in spaces that speak to you, DO IT! You never know what you might learn or who you might meet. 


#2 - Don't Take It Personally If Something Doesn't Work Out

There will be many times throughout the course of your career that things won't work out the way you planned. If the pandemic has taught us anything, it's the art of the pivot. You may test out great ideas that fail miserably for whatever reason and it's important not to berate yourself when that happens. In the book, Rebecca notes that ideas are experiments. The important thing is to learn from them and move on. "Every minute you spend stuck on the hamster wheel or why something didn't go exactly as you had planned is a minute you could be spending on creating something new." 


#3 - Networking Flows Both Ways

Relationships are everything in every industry, which is why networking is critically important for success. As you can imagine, the fashion industry in New York is notoriously cliquey, and since Rebecca started her career before the birth of social media, she was on her own when it came to navigating the world of fashion. The key to networking is about asking what can we do for each other versus asking what can you do for me? There should be a give and take. For example, if you are asking for introductions, be prepared to return the favor down the line. And don't forget to thank the people that have helped you along the way.


#4 - Talk A Lot of Shop

When Rebecca Minkoff was getting started, sample sales in New York were starting to take off. Not only was it a great way for designers to make some extra cash while cleaning out their storage rooms, it provided a fun experience for fashion fans. Rebecca noticed early on that sample sales were a great way to connect with customers and get their feedback on products. She got to eavesdrop on what people were saying and always paid attention to what products went first and which ones were left over at the end of the day. That insight proved to be invaluable and the community-building that the samples sales provided was a also a way for the brand to stay engaged with its audience. Rebecca Minkoff eventually started doing sample sales twice a year and it became an amazing way to get product into people's hands. 


#5 - Give Your Gut Some Credit

"I do not regret my big messy failures. I regret that when I knew in my gut something was wrong even when it was something small, I didn't have enough faith in myself to fight for what I knew was right," says Rebecca Minkoff. This is a big part of being fearless. You have to trust your gut. There is an inner knowing in each of us that is there to help guide us in the right direction. When we ignore that inner voice because it's not convenient, or we feel like we would be rocking the boat if we spoke up, we are blocking our own intuitive wisdom. Trust your gut. There is a reason it's called a "gut instinct" and those feelings are there for a reason. 


This is a great book for fashion students who are just starting out in the industry and want to hear words of widsom from someone who started small, worked hard, and built a $100 million dollar fashion empire. Fearless is full of lessons learned and tangible takeaways. It's a great summer read and I finished it over a long weekend. Find it at your local bookstore or on Amazon



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The Disneyland Style Guide


Disneyland is now open to out-of-state travelers (as of June 15, 2021) and the park is back to full capacity. To manage attendance, the park is requiring all guests to have advance reservations at either Disneyland or California Adventure. Park hopper passes are also available and many of them require you to start your day at California Adventure and then cross over to Disneyland at 1 p.m. (Note: Theme park reservations are limited and subject to availability so book early if you can.) 


Disney App

Downloading the Disney app in advance is critical for a seamless day at the park. You'll need it for everything from checking out estimated wait times for rides to ordering food and drinks.  From the app,  you can join the virtual queue for the Star Wars: Rise of the Resistance ride (highly recommend!) and find what you're looking for quickly with the GPS-enabled maps. 





Face Masks 

With regard to masks, face coverings are not required for fully vaccinated guests at Disneyland. Now that the park is open in full capacity, it's virtually impossible to properly social distance while waiting in line for popular rides, so plan accordingly if you want to be extra safe. 




The Best Rides

When we visited the park in mid-June, Fast Passes weren't available yet, so we had to wait in line for the rides we wanted to go on. You can burn up a lot of the day waiting in line at Disneyland, so if you have access to virtual queues or fast passes, definitely plan ahead and take advantage. Joining the virtual queue was the only way we could get on the new Star Wars: Rise of the Resistance ride and after missing the window to join several times, we FINALLY got access in the evening on our first day at Disneyland. If you have Star Wars fans in your family, this new ride can't be missed. 

At California Adventure, my kids loved going on the Radiator Springs Racers ride which is a cool kid roller coaster experience but fun for grown-ups, too. 


What to Wear

It's hot in Anaheim and generally in the 80's on most days, so be sure to apply sunscreen and dress in light-colored, lightweight fabrics or you won't last very long. We walked over 8 miles a day, both days at Disneyland and California Adventure with our park hopper passes so dressing for the weather and packing comfortable shoes is a must. 

Here are a few of my summer wardrobe favorites:

Athleta Tank Top

Gap Denim Overalls

Calson Linen Shorts

Gap Denim Shorts 

Converse Shoreline Shoes

Zella Tank Top




Downtown Disney

At Downtown Disney you'll find restaurants, shopping, and entertainment for guests of all ages. Admission is free and it's a great place to shop for Disney merch and grab dinner after a day at the park. We liked the burgers at Black Tap and tried the CrazyShake for dessert, too (pictured above). Plan in advance if you're hungry because every single restaurant had a wait time of 20-60+ minutes each time we visited. There's also a Starbucks on-site and a cool Star Wars store. 



Where to Stay 

For our Disney trip, we stayed at the Radisson Blu Anaheim, which is less than 5 minutes away from the park. The rooms are clean, spacious, and if you're traveling with kids, you can get a cool bunkbed room. The pool is great too and stays open late for evening swims. 


Disneyland is a great place to make memories with your family. Have fun, take pics, and make some epic memories!



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Jun 27, 2021

The Stylish Summer Travel Guide to SEA



Seattle has now hit the 70% vaccinated mark and as a result, we're seeing a major boost in "vacci-cations", a.k.a. the post-vaccination vacation. Yes, that's officially a thing. For many people, it's been a while since they've flown in and out of Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, now known simply as SEA. Over the past year, there have been renovations, new dining options added, new retail experiences, and even new ways to park. Here's your stylish guide to summer travel at SEA.


Parking 


SEA is now offering pre-paid parking in the airport's on-site parking garage. It's the closest, most convenient parking available, and if you pre-book, you'll get a discount. The airport has more than 12,000 parking spaces available for both short-term and long-term parking and let's be honest, after a long trip, it's so nice to be able to head straight to your car and get home quickly.
 
The process to pre-pay for parking is easy, you simply book online in advance and you'll receive an email with a QR code to scan on entry and exit.



Getting through Security 


As travel picks up again, so has the wait time at security checkpoints. Prior to the pandemic when regular travel was a routine part of our lives, we signed up for CLEAR and it was one of the best decisions we've ever made. Going through security is so easy now and we get to skip the long lines, which is critical when traveling with kids. Instead of using traditional ID documents, CLEAR uses your eyes and face to confirm your identity. You can start the enrollment online and then head to any airport CLEAR location with a valid government-issued ID to complete the sign-up process. You can use CLEAR at over 50+ airports, stadiums, and other venues nationwide. Get 2 months free by using my referral link to sign up for CLEAR.

For those that don't have CLEAR, Seattle-Tacoma International Airport is also testing out a new pilot program called SEA Spot Saver, that allows passengers to reserve a specific time to go through security in an effort to streamline wait times. The program is available from 4 a.m. to noon daily through August 31st and is available for general security passengers. Reserve your spot here.



Staying Safe


Even if you're fully vaccinated, you still need to wear a mask that fully covers your nose and mouth at the airport and on the plane during your flight. To help keep passengers safe, SEA has also added 280 hand sanitizing stations conveniently located throughout the airport. I also recommend packing sanitizing wipes in your carry-on bag so that you can wipe down the tray tables, armrests, windows, and belt buckles at your seat when you get on board. 



Dining


You'll want to arrive early to the airport so that you can take advantage of the food scene prior to departure. At SEA, you'll find local favorites like Skillet, Poke to the Max, Beecher's, Lucky Louie, Lady Yum, and more. I'm a fan of the kale caesar at Skillet and the fish and chips at Lucky Louie, but honestly, you can't go wrong with the Pacific Northwest dining options at SEA. Dining options are limited in-flight due to COVID restrictions, so eat in advance, just in case.

Here are some places to try next time you're at the airport:



A Gates - Capitol Hill Food Fall - Highlights include Chowder Shack, Grand Central Bakery, Salt & Straw, and Caffe Ladro.


B Gates - Mi Casa Cantina - The menu includes freshly baked tortas, house-made burritos, guacamole, pico de gallo, and handcrafted cocktails.


C Gates - Beecher's Handmade Cheese - If you're in the mood for comfort food, their Mac & Cheese is the world's best. You'll also find artisan cheeses, fresh salads, and Caffe Vita espresso drinks.


Central Terminal - Lucky Louie Fish Shack - If you're craving PNW-inspired food, the Fish & Chips and  Creamy Clam Chowder are both personal favorites. 

D Gates - Poke to the Max - Hawaiian food at its finest including Poke Bowls, Loco Moco, and more. Don't miss the Spam Musubi, which also makes a great travel snack for your carry-on. 


North Satellite - Skillet - Modern American food with an approachable, diner vibe. Fun fact: Skillet has an all-day brunch menu. If you're looking for something healthy-ish, I highly recommend the kale caesar with chicken. 


South Satellite Dungeness Bay Seafood House - Oh yes, it's all things Dungeness, including crab cakes, crab bisque, clams, calamari, and more. Oh, and there's a full-service bar, too. 


For a sweet treat, check out the Seattle Chocolate store (near Gate C1) that stocks 100% non-GMO, small-batch chocolate truffle bars, jcoco caramels, and special occasion gifts.


Shopping


SEA has plenty of great options if you're shopping for gifts or simply need a little retail therapy prior to your flight. Don't miss Sacred Circle, the airport's only Native American-owned shop featuring handmade jewelry and wearable art from local artisans and inland tribes. You'll also want to check out Seattle Made, an entire shop dedicated to celebrating Seattle's unique cultural identity, and Fireworks, one of my favorite places to shop for gifts.

At SEA, you'll also find CHALO, a locally-owned gift and lifestyle shop featuring Seattle-inspired products like tote bags, coffee cups, zippered pouches, and more. The lead image of this post features a Seattle boarding pass tote bag from CHALO.

Here are some of the stores you can shop at SEA:
  • Coach
  • Ex Officio
  • Fireworks
  • MAC Cosmetics 
  • Made in Washington 
  • SUB POP
  • Swarovski 
  • Show Pony



Summer Reading
 

Shop local for all the books on your summer reading list at Elliot Bay Book Co. located in the C Concourse. On my last trip to the airport, I picked up a copy of Rebecca Minkoff's new book Fearless and finished the entire book during the flight. You can also stock up on magazines at the Hudson stores located throughout the airport. 



Final Tip

Pack your patience and have fun! For many of us, it's been a long time since we traveled and it comes as no surprise that we're all a little rusty. Be patient, pack snacks, and don't forget to stay hydrated. 


Additional resources:





Keep up with my summer travel adventures on Instagram, @Sydlovesfashion


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Jun 25, 2021

Former Dolce Vita Execs Launch Oncept Shoes

Oncept Shoes


While the pandemic has been troublesome for many businesses, it has also created space for innovative new ideas to bloom. Industry veterans Megan Key Campos and Nick Lucio, both former executives at Dolce Vita, have launched a new footwear company for sustainably-minded fashion fans.

Oncept made its debut earlier this spring with the release of five core styles, each named after cities around the world. The collection includes the Athens Essential Sandal, Copenhagen Modern Mule, Nolita Forever Flat, Tokyo Travel Companion, and the London Seasonless Sneaker. With a core belief in conscious design, Oncept made the decision to produce just five styles in an effort to edit the line and avoid overproduction.

The entire collection is ethically made from sustainable materials including overstock recycled rubber, memory foam insole cushioning made from recycled rubber foam and castor bean oil, and nylon sourced from post-consumer recycled polyester. In addition, all shoes are shipped in a reusable, organic tote, without the use of traditional tissue or plastic materials inside the box. Other eco-friendly details include organic cotton laces, recycled insole boards, recycled fabric tags, and TENCEL™ Lyocell linings, which are produced from wood pulp. Learn more about Oncept's commitment to sustainability here.

The London - An elevated, sporty sneaker with a flexible rubber outsole. Available in 3 colors. 


The Athens - An easy, and effortless essential sandal. Available in 7 colors. 


The Copenhagen - An elevated, modern mule. Available in 4 colors. 


The Tokyo - A lightweight sneaker for everyday wear. Available in 6 colors. 


The Nolita - A minimalist, versatile flat. Available in 7 colors. 





This line is perfect for fashion fans who want to shop with their values in mind. Oncept shoes are versatile, easy to wear, and will seamlessly transition from season to season. Prices start at $250 USD.


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Jun 10, 2021

5 Tips for Teaching Kids to Swim

Summer is here and chances are if you have kids, you'll be swimming to beat the heat. This is often the time of year when parents start thinking about swim lessons and while those may be valuable for some kids, consistently spending time in the water with your children can be just as effective. I taught both of my kids to swim over the years and made it a point to teach them critical water safety skills. My kids definitely don't know the butterfly or backstroke, but I have been successful at teaching them to swim safely and feel more confident in the water. Here are 5 tips for teaching kids how to swim:


1 - Get a Puddle Jumper

It's important that kids get comfortable being in the water even before they know how to fully swim. We found that having a Puddle Jumper was a great way to help our kids practice kicks and back floats. These skills are critical for swimming and the puddle jumpers offered a great range of motion. Both of our kids started swimming with puddle jumpers in the beginning and then graduated to swimming puddle jumper-free as time went on. 

Note: Kids need to be supervised in the water even while wearing puddle jumpers. We used them exclusively for helping our kids stay above water while teaching them swimming skills.  






2 - Buy a Snorkel Mask 

Fact: It's hard to swim without getting water on your face. The truth is, most kids are afraid of getting their faces wet and are even more terrified of getting water up their nose. We found that snorkel masks (the kind that fully covers the nose) were helpful when teaching our kids to swim because they eliminated the problem of getting water in the eyes or nose. It's really hard for kids to be able to plug their nose while also using both arms to swim, so the snorkel mask is key. We also found that snorkel masks were more durable than traditional goggles and didn't allow water to leak in while swimming. Once kids can see in the water and stop worrying about getting their faces wet, they will instantly be more engaged. 




3 - Teach Water Safety 

Drowning can happen in just a few inches of water so it's critical to teach kids about water safety when they are young. Early on we learned the importance of teaching our kids best practices around water to keep everyone safe. In addition to basic things like no running near the pool to avoid slipping, we also ensure that kids get permission from an adult before entering the water. Oversized pool floats, older kids in water, and crowded pools can make it hard for little ones to swim around safely. 

We also make sure that there is a designated adult ready to watch the kids and keep an eye out for any horeseplay that could pose a risk to kid safety. It only takes a second for kids to quietly slip under the water so it's important that they have your undivided attention. At kid parties and other group swim activities, you also want to watch out for horseplay that could accidentally cause kids to get trapped underwater, even if for just for a second. 

If I'm teaching kids to swim, I like to focus on one child at a time. So when my kids were small, that meant putting one in a puddle jumper to swim around while I was actively working on building skills with the other one. It's also important to remember that kids get very tired when swimming because it's a full body workout, so remember to take breaks and get out of the pool when you notice kids getting tired. 







4 - Teach Key Skills 

As I mentioned earlier in this post, I'm not a professional swim coach and when I taught my kids to swim, my ultimate goal was to keep them from drowning. I didn't care if they could do the butterfly or the backstroke, I wanted them to be able to swim to the edge of the pool and rescue themselves if they were in a bad situation. I taught both kids how to float on their backs so that they could keep their face out of the water and take a break if they were tired of swimming. I also taught them how to effectively kick their legs and paddle with their arms to quickly get to the pool edge. 

To teach the backfloat, use a puddle jumper or an alternate floatation device and "spot" kids under their back so that they can lay flat and practice holding themselves steady. Practice in shallow water at a depth where kids can easily touch the bottom of the pool so that they can put their feet down if needed. 

To teach kicking skills, have kids hold on the pool edge while they practice kicking their legs to simulate swimming. 

As my kids developed their skills, I would then remove their puddle jumper and position them close to the pool stairs (while I carried them) so that eventually they could practice swimming to the stairs on their own without the use of a flotation device. It takes time, but they'll get it eventually. Keeping the swim distance short and the depth shallow is the key to early success. 




5 - Be Consistent

As with any skill, repetition is key. You have to give kids frequent access to practice their swim skills if you want them to be strong swimmers. This might mean finding open swim times at your community swimming pool and taking your kids in the evening a few times a week. It might mean doing a staycation in the city somewhere with a pool so that you can commit to swimming every day for a week. It might mean signing your kid up for swim lessons for a week in the summer and then continuing their skill development on your own. Or, it might look like something totally different. Find what works for you and stick with it. 

Trust me, the LAST thing I wanted to do when my kids were small was put on a swimsuit and get in the pool to teach my kids how to swim. I prefer sitting poolside with a fashion magazine and a tropical drink, but, I knew how important it was to teach them how to swim so that they could safely enjoy the water. It is possible to do, but it does take patience and time. But isn't that true of anything that's worth doing?



Here are some pools around Seattle that we love:

Pop Mounger Pool - Magnolia

Colman Pool - West Seattle 

Queen Anne Community Pool - Queen Anne 

Four Seasons Seattle Infinity Pool - Downtown Seattle 

Nelson Dairy Farm Pool - Suncadia 


Full disclosure, I'm not a certified swim instructor, I'm just a mom who taught her kids how to swim. 

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What's New at Pacific Place

 


After a two-and-a-half-year renovation, Pacific Place, Seattle's downtown shopping center, quietly opened its doors last summer at the height of the pandemic. The big reveal unveiled a modern new look for the property but ultimately left fashion fans underwhelmed when it came to the actual shopping experience because only a fraction of the original retailers remained. After all, we were in the midst of a global pandemic and many of the retailers that had once called Pacific Place home had closed up shop or moved on to other locations that were foot traffic-friendly. 

During its lengthy renovation, Pacific Place embraced a pop-in strategy, allowing indie retailers to utilize short-term, temporary spaces. As a result, a variety of Seattle retailers including The Handmade Showroom, JNBY, and Bezel & Kiln, made use of the space and added newness to the property while testing out retail concepts that would otherwise have been cost-prohibitive. Art galleries including Gallery Onyx and Ghost Gallery also opened their doors at Pacific Place, giving shoppers a fun and easy way to experience local art. The WOW Gallery is scheduled to open on June 18th. More info on the opening party can be found here

In addition to art and indie retailers, Pacific Place is also still home to national brands like lululemon, Tiffany & Co., Aveda, and AT&T. And of course, there's still plenty of great dining options including Thai Ginger, Johnny Rockets, Pike Place Chowder, Haidilao Hot Pot, and Din Tai Fung. 



Other noteworthy updates:

+ During COVID, AMC Pacific Place is offering guests the ability to rent out a theater for private parties. For $249+ tax you can host up to 20 guests and enjoy a private movie experience. Learn more


+ Din Tai Fung is now offering vegan menu items including Vegan Wontons with House Spicy Sauce, Vegan Noodles with Sesame Sauce, Vegan Noodle Soup, and Vegan Wonton Soup. 


+ You can now visit Dress for Success at Pacific Place on Level 3. Dress for Success helps empower women to achieve economic independence by providing support, development tools, and professional attire. By appointment only. Save the date! The virtual Summer Soiree is scheduled for June 24th. 



Pacific Place 
600 Pine Street
Seattle, WA 98101

Find Pacific Place on Instagram @Pacific_Place


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Jun 9, 2021

The Cura Co. unveils Hanae Collection



The Cura Co. has unveiled a new limited-run apparel collection designed to offer fashion fans ethically-made wardrobe pieces that will effortlessly transition from season to season. The 13-piece Hanae Collection, co-created in Cambodia with Cura’s zero-waste production partners, was made using pre-consumer textile waste that would otherwise have gone unused. Each piece embraces a slow fashion ethos and can be styled in multiple ways to create a variety of looks. The goal of the Hanae collection is to provide timeless foundation pieces for a sustainable wardrobe.

“We are committed to mindful, ethical fashion,” says Cura Co. founder Kiko Eisner-Waters, “The Hanae collection is designed to be seasonless and will be released with rolling drop dates that reflect and embrace our vision for the future of fashion that takes into account both people and the planet.”




Five of the thirteen styles from the Hanae Collection are available now in multiple colorways and fabrications. New styles from the line will be released periodically throughout the season. By embracing a slow fashion production schedule that intentionally pivots from the traditional fashion calendar, The Cura Co. is leading with its commitment to ethical and sustainable fashion. Each piece was designed in Seattle and handmade in Phnom Penh, Cambodia at a female-founded, woman-owned production facility. The partnership is a true collaboration with talented makers who specialize in their craft. The size-inclusive, versatile range includes jumpsuits, dresses, tunics, and pants.



About The Cura Co.

The Cura Co. is a one-stop shop for conscious living. Founded by fashion industry veteran Kiko Eisner-Waters in 2019, Cura helps simplify your values-based lifestyle by making it easier to shop from a curated mix of ethical brands. Deeply rooted at the intersection of beauty, art, equity, and impact, CURA provides an intentional connection between producer and consumer. Female-forward with social justice at the core of its model, The Cura Co. is more than just a brand - it’s a conscious lifestyle. Learn more at thecuraco.com.



The Cura Co. 
2407 E. Union St. #D
Seattle, WA 98122

Hours
Tues. - Sun.
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. 



Photo credit: Jessica Garcia 




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May 16, 2021

I Know A Place: Seattle Fashion Edition


As a long-time Seattleite who loves exploring, I know many places around town that truly make this city a magical place to live. We have gorgeous bodies of water surrounding us, clear skies, clean air, and innovative ideas. My friends frequently come to me to ask for recommendations on hidden gems around town like must-visit boutiques and great places to dine with kids. I constantly find myself saying the phrase, "I Know A Place", so it's only fitting that Visit Seattle asked to highlight a few of my favorite places for their spring campaign. Long-time readers may remember that I partnered with them last fall on a series of posts about where (and how) to shop locally during the holiday season. You can view those posts here, here, and here

For our latest collab, I explored the city through a fashion lens by visiting beloved book stores, new pop-ups, and indie shops that are too good to miss. My family and I capped the day with a delicious dinner at Goldfinch Tavern before turning in for the night at the Four Seasons. Here's an overview of our itinerary filled with insider tips for safely exploring the city in style. 


I know a place....that curates a gorgeous assortment of global fashion brands. 

Flora & Henri has been locally owned and operated since 1998. The Seattle concept shop located on the corner of First and Jackson in Pioneer Square is visually stunning and perfectly curated with beautiful products for the entire family. At Flora & Henri, you'll find a mix of local favorites like handbags from Ampersand as Apostrophe merchandised next to dreamy, global favorites like dresses from Italian brand Loretta Caponi. View a round-up of my favorite spring must-haves here


I know a place...where you can shop local for ethically made clothing and shoes.

Clementine's in Pioneer Square offers fashion fans a unique place to shop from small brands who value slow fashion. Owner Linda Walsh is passionate about providing an inclusive space for people to make conscious fashion choices. Featured brands include Paloma Wool, People Tree, and Prairie Underground. The store is currently open Wednesday through Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. 


I know a place...where you can shop an amazing selection of local authors. 

If the pandemic was good for anything, it was simply to remind us that we're always just one book away from a great escape. Elliott Bay Book Co. on Capitol Hill is a full-service, locally owned bookstore home to over 150,000 titles. As a lifelong bookworm and #ShopLocal fan, I love the fact that they give valuable shelf space to local authors including astrologer Stephanie Gailing, who released not one, but TWO books during quarantine. Stephanie's latest books, The Complete Book of Dreams and The Complete Guide to Astrological Self-Care offer readers a holistic approach to everyday wellness. As a Virgo, I'm a big fan of astrological insight and after devouring Stephanie's dream book, I'm really excited to dive into her self-care guide that features sections for each of the twelve zodiac signs. 

* Elliott Bay Book Co. also carries the Seattle Style: Fashion/Function book by MOHAI curator Clara Berg, which originally accompanied the 2019 Seattle fashion exhibit.  


I know a place...where you can shop one of Seattle's best heritage brands. 

Filson has been around since 1897, originally outfitting prospectors passing through the city on their way to the Klondike gold rush. The Seattle flagship is a fun place to experience the roots of the brand and witness its evolution. In addition to shopping in person, customers can opt for curbside pick-up for orders made over the phone. Same day delivery services are also being offered from the flagship store within a specific radius. Visit the store later this month and you'll be among the first to experience new arrivals to Filson's limited-edition Smokey Bear Collection, a continued partnership designed to communicate the importance of wildfire prevention. New products from this special collection will be available at the Flagship starting on May 28. The product mix includes a variety of must-have items including a Smokey Bear enamelwear camp set, authentic ranger hat, and full zip hoodie. 


I know a place...where you can shop an incredible selection of international fashion magazines.

Earlier this year, Big Little News quietly opened up shop on Capitol Hill. Woman-owned and operated, this hidden gem is brimming with specialty magazines like British Vogue, Elle UK, Paris Vogue, and more. In addition, you'll also find indie magazines that cover a variety of interests and must-have items to accompany your reading material, like bottles of champagne and giant boxes of candy. 


I know a place...where you can shop a limited time pop-up featuring amazing brands. 

Seattle's beloved Baby & Co. boutique closed its doors locally last summer due to the pandemic but they're back in town for a limited time only as part of the 10th Ave Collective Pop-Up happening now through June 6. Located on Capitol Hill in the old Totokaelo space, the 10th Ave Collective features apparel and accessories from Baby & Co., art from Robin Layton, and home goods from Susan Wheeler. I picked up a bottle of the Poets of Berlin perfume by Vilhelm while I was at the shop this weekend and it has quickly become my new favorite fragrance. 


I know a place...where you can shop a great mix of local designers that handmake their goods in Seattle.

Located in Belltown, Sassafras is a retail shop and fashion studio home to a variety of local brands including Stone Crow Designs, Bartle B., and La Mac√≥n by Shari Noble. The shop is a hub for independent fashion designers from around the city and offers a great way for fashion fans to shop a selection of local brands all under one roof. Personal shopping appointments are available and can easily be booked online.  



I know a place...where you can enjoy an amazing dinner complete with sweeping views of the Puget Sound. 

Goldfinch Tavern, located at the Four Seasons, serves up Pacific Northwest-inspired cuisine featuring locally-sourced ingredients. From the drinks menu, start with the Smoked Manhattan and then move on to my favorite main course: Cedar Plank King Salmon served with vegetables from Pike Place Market. As a side dish, you have to try the Goldfinch Lobster Mashers. I'm still dreaming about the decadence of this acclaimed side dish.  Insider tip: Flat rate parking is available when dining at the restaurant. 




I know a place...where you can escape the ordinary and enjoy a staycation in the heart of the city. 

Four Seasons Seattle is the perfect place to visit when you need to recharge but want to stay in the city. We loved the views from our room of the Washington State Ferries and of the iconic Seattle Great Wheel. Room service is a must for breakfast (my daughter highly recommends the blueberry pancakes) and if you have time, the spa is a magically rejuvenating place that is good for both the body and soul. The Infinity Pool overlooking Puget Sound is also open daily for guests from 6  a.m. to 9 p.m. 


What are your favorite places to shop around town? I'd love to hear from you! Send me an email or leave me a comment on this post and tell me your favorite shops to explore around town. 

* This post was written in partnership with Visit Seattle. 

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